Title: Cultural differences in tertiary students' conceptions of learning as a duty and student achievement

Authors: Elizabeth R. Peterson; Gavin T.L. Brown; Richard J. Hamilton

Addresses: School of Psychology, University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland, New Zealand ' Faculty of Education, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand ' Faculty of Education, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand

Abstract: Differences in Asian and European tertiary students' conceptions of learning as a duty were examined in two studies. In Study 1 (N = 231), Asian students (compared to European students) reported significantly higher levels of negative emotions in response to their self-reported duty scenario. In Study 2 (N = 351), using structural equation modelling, three first-order learning as a duty factors were identified (duty to obtain qualification, duty to learn for others and duty to work hard) with good model fit. Multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis found the Asian students and European students endorsed the three learning as a duty factors differently, and subsequent analysis found the relationship between the three learning as a duty conceptions and achievement differed across the two ethnic groups. Asian students had statistically significant paths from all three learning as duty factors to achievement, while the model for European students, had only one significant path to achievement (duty to work hard).

Keywords: conceptions of learning; duty; obligation; ethnic differences; student achievement; education; beliefs; cultural differences; tertiary students; higher education; Europe; Asia; structural equation modelling; SEM; obtain qualifications; learn for others; work hard; culture.

DOI: 10.1504/IJQRE.2013.056462

International Journal of Quantitative Research in Education, 2013 Vol.1 No.2, pp.167 - 181

Received: 11 Apr 2013
Accepted: 18 Apr 2013

Published online: 29 Apr 2014 *

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