Title: Differences in dietary consumption patterns and obesity rates between immigrants from the former USSR and a country's native population

Authors: A. Manoff; H. Vardi; R.S. Enten; Danit R. Shahar

Addresses: The S. Daniel Abraham International Center for Health and Nutrition, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel. ' The S. Daniel Abraham International Center for Health and Nutrition, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel; Epidemiology and Health Evaluation Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University, Israel. ' The S. Daniel Abraham International Center for Health and Nutrition, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel. ' The S. Daniel Abraham International Center for Health and Nutrition, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105, Israel

Abstract: This study compared dietary intake, obesity rates and chronic disease prevalence between former USSR immigrants and the native Israeli population using random sample survey and dietary intake assessment. USSR immigrants had significantly higher BMI (27.6 ± 5.0 vs. 26.5 ± 4.7kg/m², P = 0.002) despite lower energy intake (1547.8 ± status (51% vs. 74%, P < 0.01), and higher incidence of heart attack (17% vs. 9%, P < 0.01) and hypertension (37% vs. 24%, P < 0.01). They consumed significantly less vitamin D, iron, calcium, folate, riboflavin and sodium (P < 0.01) and significantly less vitamin C and E, B6, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc and niacin (P < 0.05). Immigration status and diseases were significant predictors for obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m², OR = 1.66, P = 0.003 and OR = 1.17, P = 0.01). Former USSR immigrants are at increased risk for obesity and other chronic diseases and should be encouraged to consume more green vegetables, to lower energy density.

Keywords: fruit; vegetables; vegetable consumption; USSR immigrants; dietary consumption patterns; obesity rates; chronic diseases; Russia; Israel; native population; dietary intake; health status; heart attacks; hypertension; BMI; body mass index; vitamins.

DOI: 10.1504/IJFSNPH.2011.044531

International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health, 2011 Vol.4 No.2/3/4, pp.119 - 130

Received: 02 Jul 2010
Accepted: 08 Feb 2011

Published online: 29 Dec 2011 *

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