Title: The effects of interactivity and product information on consumers' emotional responses to an online retail setting

Authors: Paul W. Ballantine, David R. Fortin

Addresses: Department of Management, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand. ' Department of Management, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand

Abstract: This study examined how two aspects of an online shopping environment can influence the emotional states of consumers, and how these emotions subsequently affect their intentions to purchase products online. A web-based experiment (using a 3 × 3 between-subjects factorial design) was conducted, where respondents were exposed to a simulated online retail store. A total of 360 responses were collected from web users. The two independent variables examined were level of interactivity and amount of information. Emotion was measured using the two emotional states of pleasure and arousal. Results suggest that a linear relationship exists between the level of interactivity provided by an online store and pleasure. Moreover, pleasure (and in some cases arousal) was found to be a significant predictor of the likelihood that a consumer would purchase products online.

Keywords: online shopping; interface design; consumer behaviour; emotion; interactivity; product information; consumer responses; emotional responses; online retailing; e-tailing; e-shopping; purchasing intentions; online stores; web users.

DOI: 10.1504/IJIMA.2009.027810

International Journal of Internet Marketing and Advertising, 2009 Vol.5 No.4, pp.260 - 271

Available online: 11 Aug 2009 *

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