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International Journal of Web Based Communities

 

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International Journal of Web Based Communities (1 paper in press)

Special Issue on: Lurking around the Corners of the Social Media Bastions

  • Security Information Sharing via Twitter: "Heartbleed" as a Case Study   Order a copy of this article
    by Debora Jeske 
    Abstract: The current paper outlines an exploratory case study in which we examined the extent to which specific communities of Twitter users engaged with the debate about the security threat known as Heartbleed in the first few days after this threat was exposed. The case study explored which professional groups appeared to lead the debate about Heartbleed, the nature of the communication (tweets and retweets), and evidence about behaviour change. Using keywords from the Twitter user profiles, six occupational groups were identified, each of which were likely to have a direct interest in learning about Heartbleed (including legal, financial, entrepreneurial, press, and IT professionals). The groups participated to different degrees in the debate about Heartbleed. This exploratory case study provides an insight into information sharing, potential communities of influence, and points for future research in the absence of a voice of authority in the field of cybersecurity.
    Keywords: Heartbleed; Twitter; social influence; behavioural change; case study.