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Title: The BGR contingency model for leading change

 

Author: Derek R. Brown; Raymond Gordon; Dennis Michael Rose

 

Address: School of Management and Marketing, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield Campus, PO Box 4196, Springfield Central, Qld 4300, Australia ' School of Management and Marketing, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield Campus, PO Box 4196, Springfield Central, Qld 4300, Australia ' School of Management and Marketing, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield Campus, PO Box 4196, Springfield Central, Qld 4300, Australia

 

Journal: Int. J. of Learning and Change, 2012 Vol.6, No.1/2, pp.66 - 78

 

Abstract: The continuing failure rates of change initiatives, combined with an increasingly complex business environment, have created significant challenges for the practice of change management. High failure rates suggest that existing change models are not working, or are being incorrectly used. A different mindset to change is required. The BGR Contingency Model (named after the authors' surnames) for leading change facilitates the required mindset, and addresses the issue of leadership decision-making as one of the major contributors to high change initiative failure rates. Drawing on four propositions offered, the conceptual model is based on the interdependency of ethics and logic in leadership decision-making in change initiatives. The model has specific, formal checkpoints of this interdependency. Its basic design is a series of progressions, or groups of tasks, which start with the strategic and continue through the operational to the tactical levels of the organisation, in an iterative fashion.

 

Keywords: change management; leadership; ethics; decision-making; BGR contingency model; Derek Brown; Raymond Gordon; Dennis Michael Rose; failure rates; change initiatives; business environments; change models; mindsets; interdependency; logic; progressions; strategic tasks; operational tasks; tactical levels; iterative approaches; learning behaviour; change contexts.

 

DOI: 10.1504/IJLC.2012.045857

10.1504/12.45857

 

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