Forthcoming and Online First Articles

Journal of Design Research

Journal of Design Research (JDR)

Forthcoming articles have been peer-reviewed and accepted for publication but are pending final changes, are not yet published and may not appear here in their final order of publication until they are assigned to issues. Therefore, the content conforms to our standards but the presentation (e.g. typesetting and proof-reading) is not necessarily up to the Inderscience standard. Additionally, titles, authors, abstracts and keywords may change before publication. Articles will not be published until the final proofs are validated by their authors.

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J. of Design Research (8 papers in press)

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  • Product interaction sounds influence product personality   Order a copy of this article
    by Cristiano Klanovicz, Charles Spence, Leandro Tonetto 
    Abstract: We report an experiment designed to test the hypothesis that the sonic interaction between the type of sole used in high-heeled shoes (polypropylene vs. leather) and the type of flooring (ceramic vs. carpet) influences the attribution of personality traits to the product sound. Forty-eight women walked down a “virtual runway” while listening to the modified interaction sounds of shoe heels contacting the floor. After being exposed to each sound, the participants filled in a questionnaire to measure product sound personality traits and the valence associated with each sound. The results revealed that different personality traits were assigned to distinct product sounds with the floor material influencing the attribution of such characteristics. These results promote awareness of the relevance of designing the environments where users interact with products to shape product sound personality.
    Keywords: auditory perception; sonic interaction; multisensory perception; user experience; consumer behaviour.
    DOI: 10.1504/JDR.2022.10049558
     
  • Digital Imitation of Batik, Tie-Dye and Weave Effects for Manual Screen Printing   Order a copy of this article
    by Ebenezer Kofi Howard, Benjamin Kwablah Asinyo, Raphael Kanyire Seidu, Akosua Mawuse Amankwah, Cynthia Akua Chichi, Portia Anyan 
    Abstract: Batik, tie-dye and woven structures are the most popular, unique, exotic and attractive forms of art. These special fabrics have a significant number of interesting designs and patterns cherished by most consumers. Despite these, it is observed that producers have issues with their mode of production. Notably, the chemicals used, such as sodium hydrosulphite and caustic soda for batik/tie-dye, are harmful to humans, causing suffocation when inhaled and posing serious health issues to producers and users. This study explored the possibility of replicating these effects through hand screen printing, a versatile and relatively easy technique for patterning fabrics. Art studio-based experimental and observation approaches were used. The experiment sought to determine the behaviour some fabrics will pose when subjected to a particular printing method necessary to identify and document suitable materials and techniques for the study. The results revealed feasible and unique surface textile patterns closely resembling batik, tie-dye.
    Keywords: Studio experimentation; Screen printing; Batik; Tie-dye; Weaves.

  • What makes design research more useful for design professionals? An exploration of the research-practice gap   Order a copy of this article
    by Marieke Zielhuis, Froukje Sleeswijk Visser, Daan Andriessen, Pieter Jan Stappers 
    Abstract: Academic design research has developed a rich collection of knowledge and tools, but often the results fail to land in design practice. We conducted an interview series with experienced design professionals to study how the knowledge that they derived from research projects was of use to them. They used tools, papers, books, and their own experiences in research projects to learn about designing, about the application domain and about project organization. We found that useful knowledge for design practice can take various formats, including prescribing tools which serve as demonstrator and a reference frame. We discuss how academic researchers can use these insight to make their research more applicable in a way that meets the design practice needs.
    Keywords: design research; research outcomes; research impact; research-practice gap; design practice.
    DOI: 10.1504/JDR.2022.10049802
     
  • Identification of similar design principles of passenger cars using deep neural networks   Order a copy of this article
    by Fayaz Ahasan, Sebastian Schoenen, Andreas Witte 
    Abstract: This paper demonstrates the idea of using deep neural networks to identify similar design principles. It is shown how a neural network originally trained to classify the images of cars to their respective brands, can also be used to identify car models following similar design principles across different brands. The proposed approach involves a comprehensive error analysis on the predictions of the deep neural network to draw inferences about design similarities of car models produced by different manufacturers. Several examples of car models following close design patterns across different brands are identified using this approach.
    Keywords: deep neural networks; similar design principles; passenger cars; error analysis; car brand recognition; CNN; similar car models; confusion matrix; design patent infringement.
    DOI: 10.1504/JDR.2022.10051661
     
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