Title: The themes of metalworking in the Saljuqid period vis-à-vis Khorasan and Mosul schools

Authors: Samad Parvin; Habib Shahbazi Shiran; Maryam Mastalizadeh

Addresses: Department of Humanities, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Iran ' Department of Humanities, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Iran ' Department of Humanities, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Iran

Abstract: The Saljuqs were originally nomadic tribes and nomadic Turkmen from Kyrgyz regions of Central Asia. In the early 11th century, the Saljuqs began their reign by seizing a major part of Transoxiana. The Saljuqid is one of the most important eras in Islamic-Iranian civilisation in which different fine arts reached an unprecedented apogee of flourishing in the history of Iran. The remaining objects from this period show that metalworking was highly developed. Similar to previous eras, silver and gold were rarely used in the Saljuqid era because of religious bans. Silver and gold were used for plating less valuable metals such as bronze and brass. The aim of this article is to examine the forms, themes, and metals used in the Saljuqid era and to investigate the innovations made by two artistic movements, namely, Khorasan and Mosul. Some of the most important art and crafts schools, especially metalworking, of this era were Khorasan and Mosul. This article is based on bibliographic research with an analytical-descriptive approach. First the themes are analysed, followed by a study of the symbols, and finally an analysis of the intention behind them.

Keywords: metalworking; decorations; the Saljuqs; Khorasan; Mosul.

DOI: 10.1504/IJART.2019.097350

International Journal of Arts and Technology, 2019 Vol.11 No.1, pp.127 - 138

Available online: 10 Jan 2019 *

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