Title: Somatosensory perception of running shoe mass is similar for both sexes

Authors: Mary G. Hausler; Taylor L. Conroy; Christopher L. Kliethermes; David S. Senchina

Addresses: Exercise Science and Sports Medicine Lab, Biology Department, Drake University, 208 Olin Hall, 2507 University Ave., Des Moines, IA 50311, USA ' Exercise Science and Sports Medicine Lab, Biology Department, Drake University, 208 Olin Hall, 2507 University Ave., Des Moines, IA 50311, USA ' Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Drake University, 418 Olin Hall, 2507 University Ave., Des Moines, IA 50311, USA ' Biology Department, Drake University, 415 Olin Hall, 2507 University Ave., Des Moines, IA 50311, USA

Abstract: Somatosensory perception of running shoe mass has not been studied in females, and so it is also unclear whether it differs between the sexes. Seventy-five young adults (50 females, 25 males) participated across two experiments to determine mass perception accuracy when hands vs. feet were used, and whether relative shoe mass range influenced experimental outcomes. Somatosensory perception of running shoe mass was similar for both sexes (regardless of the relative range of shoe mass), and hands were more accurate than feet, especially when hefting multiple models simultaneously vs. one-at-a-time. If shoe mass is an important consideration for consumers when trying shoes in retail settings, they should trust the perception of their hands more than their feet.

Keywords: haptic; mass; proprioception; running shoe; somatosensory perception; touch.

DOI: 10.1504/IJHFE.2016.083502

International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics, 2016 Vol.4 No.3/4, pp.213 - 228

Received: 01 Aug 2016
Accepted: 21 Sep 2016

Published online: 07 Apr 2017 *

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