Title: Musculoskeletal symptoms among string instrumentalists in the Nigerian population: a cross-sectional study of prevalence and associated risk factors

Authors: Egwuonwu Afamefuna Victor; Ucheji Kosisochukwu Valeria; Ihegihu Yvonne Ebere; Ekechukwu Nelson Echezona; Abaraogu Ukachukwu Okoroafor

Addresses: Department of Human Kinetics and Ergonomics, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa ' Department of Physiotherapy, University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Gwagwalada, Federal Capital Territory, Nigeria ' Department of Physitherapy, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi, Anambra, Nigeria ' Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Science and Technology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria ' Department of Medical Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Science and Technology, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu, Nigeria

Abstract: String instrumentalists experience musculoskeletal symptoms that are likely associated with string playing, due to repetitive precise and delicate movements required to play the instruments. The study evaluated prevalence and associated risk factors of MSS among string instrumentalists in the Nigerian population. A cross-sectional survey design was employed to evaluate 12-month prevalence of MS symptoms using a 41-item questionnaire adapted for the Nigerian string instrumentalists, which sought information on; socio-demographic characteristics of respondents, playing history and habitual practices, 12-month prevalence, symptoms distribution and duration, occupational stress and performance anxiety and lastly subjective health complaints, using perceived general health status of respondents. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics of mean, frequency and percentages, while Chi-square was used to test association with alpha level set at p < 0.05. The result showed a very high 12-month prevalence of 81.4% of MSS among string instrumentalists in the Nigerian population. The wrists, neck and lower back were the most affected by 75.3, 74.2 and 66.7%, respectively. It was observed that 12-month prevalence of MSS was significantly associated with the number of instruments played, carriage method, warm-up, cool-down, general life and work stress (p < 0.05), while age, years of practice and duration of playing were not significantly associated with MSS. The study showed that MSS are highly prevalent among Nigerian string instrumentalists. Thus, providing appropriate occupational/ergonomic interventions is imperative.

Keywords: musculoskeletal disorders; prevalence; risk factors; string instrumentalists; musicians; string instruments; Nigeria; wrists; neck; lower back; ergonomics; human factors.

DOI: 10.1504/IJHFE.2016.082242

International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics, 2016 Vol.4 No.2, pp.169 - 183

Available online: 13 Feb 2017 *

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