Title: Personalised-adaptive learning - an operational framework for developing competency-based curricula in computer information technology

Authors: Jay Shiro Tashiro; Patrick C.K. Hung; Miguel Vargas Martin; Alison Leigh Brown; Frederick M. Hurst

Addresses: University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada ' University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada ' University of Ontario Institute of Technology, 2000 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa, Ontario, Canada ' Northern Arizona University, South San Francisco Street, Flagstaff, AZ, 86001, USA ' Northern Arizona University, South San Francisco Street, Flagstaff, AZ, 86001, USA

Abstract: In this paper, we explore the intersection of grounded theory in cognition and learning with the operational frameworks needed to develop and evaluate adaptive learning systems. As a test case, we studied an online personalised competency-based CIT curriculum at Northern Arizona University (Flagstaff, Arizona, USA). Our approach focused on strategies for adding adaptive learning capacities to an extant learning management system, with particular attention to cost-effective yet evidence-based approaches for improving learning outcomes. We designed elements that would enhance feedback and remediation for students, which required developing software engines that could integrate data collection and analysis. Such capacities are essential to drive evidence-based educational practices for CIT undergraduate and graduate programmes. Research led to a conceptual model and the operational facets for personalised-adaptive learning CIT educational environments. The conceptual and operational model described herein is called SIGNAL CIT Education - Serial Integration of Guiding Nodes for Adaptive Learning in CIT Education.

Keywords: personalised learning; personalisation; adaptive learning; competency-based learning; evidence-based learning; e-learning; electronic learning; online learning; e-teaching; electronic teaching; learning assessment; misconception development; knowledge systems; CIT curricula; computer technology; information technology; USA; United States; learning management systems; LMS; higher education; student feedback; student remediation.

DOI: 10.1504/IJIL.2016.076793

International Journal of Innovation and Learning, 2016 Vol.19 No.4, pp.412 - 430

Received: 25 Oct 2014
Accepted: 12 Nov 2014

Published online: 13 Apr 2016 *

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