Title: Assessment of farmer preferred organisations and institutions by gender in different smallholder areas of Zimbabwe

Authors: Kumbirai Musiyiwa; Walter Leal Filho; Justice Nyamangara

Addresses: School of Science and the Environment, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester, M1 5GD, UK; International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Matopos Research Station, P.O. Box 776, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe ' School of Science and the Environment, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester, M1 5GD, UK; Faculty of Life Sciences, Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Lohbruegger Kirchstraße 65, Sector S4 / Room 0.38, 21033 Hamburg, Germany ' International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Matopos Research Station, P.O. Box 776, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe

Abstract: Information on institutions and organisations preferred by male and female farmers is important for technology adoption and mainstreaming gender in climate change planning. The objective of this study was to analyse institutions and organisations preferred by male and female farmers in smallholder areas of Zimbabwe. Study sites from sub-humid areas were Mazowe/Goromonzi and Kadoma districts, and from semi-arid areas Matobo and Chiredzi districts. Information collected through household surveys and focus group discussions included farming practices, sources of agricultural technologies, membership to farmer groups, and roles of farmer organisations and farmer preferences. Farming systems differed whereas roles of farmer-oriented institutions and NGOs were mostly similar across the study sites. Institutions, organisations, and technologies preferred by farmers differed by both gender and site. There is need for different information and technological interventions for male and female farmers in different smallholder areas of Zimbabwe.

Keywords: farming systems; female-headed households; production constraints; information interventions; technological interventions; technology sources; farmer groups; farmer preferred organisations; smallholder areas; Zimbabwe; male farmers; female farmers; women; farming practices; agricultural technology; agriculture; gender roles.

DOI: 10.1504/IJARGE.2015.074102

International Journal of Agricultural Resources, Governance and Ecology, 2015 Vol.11 No.3/4, pp.311 - 329

Available online: 07 Jan 2016 *

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