Title: Continuously variable transmission design for optimum vehicle performance by analytical target cascading

Authors: V.Y. Blouin, G.M. Fadel, I.Q. Haque, J.R. Wagner, H.B. Samuels

Addresses: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0921, USA. ' Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0921, USA. ' Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0921, USA. ' Department of Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0921, USA. ' Advanced Engineering Center, Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI 48124, USA

Abstract: The applicability of analytical target cascading (ATC) to the design of a continuously variable transmission (CVT) for optimum vehicle performance is studied. ATC is a powerful methodology for the optimisation of complex multilevel systems based on appropriate decomposition and coordination. Several time-dependent mathematical models of a mid-size truck|s longitudinal dynamics, powertrain, and power-split CVT were developed and used to analyse the vehicle performance. A detailed geometric model of the CVT primary and secondary pulleys was also developed. These models were implemented in a three-level ATC formulation. In this paper, the decomposition and coordination procedure in the context of ATC is described. The development of system models and their level of detail are discussed with attention focused on tradeoffs between model complexity and computer execution speed. Practical aspects of the iterative process, the multi-criteria optimisation problems, and the selection of arbitrary parameters inherent to ATC are highlighted to offer insight to the practicing engineer. Numerical results of the study illustrate the applicability of ATC to simulation-based design of complex systems.

Keywords: analytical target cascading; ATC; continuously variable transmission; CVT design; optimum vehicle performance; simulation-based design; transmission design; truck dynamics; vehicle dynamics; geometric modelling.

DOI: 10.1504/IJHVS.2004.005454

International Journal of Heavy Vehicle Systems, 2004 Vol.11 No.3/4, pp.327 - 348

Published online: 04 Oct 2004 *

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