Title: Analysis of the riveting process forming mechanisms

Authors: E. Markiewicz, B. Langrand, E. Deletombe, P. Drazetic, L. Patronelli

Addresses: Industrial and Human Automatic Control and Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Research Group (URA CNRS D1775), University of Valenciennes – Le Mont Houy, B.P. 311, 59304 Valenciennes Cedex, France. ' Industrial and Human Automatic Control and Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Research Group ONERA-Lille, Solid and Damage Mechanics Department, Structural Resistance and Design Section, 5, Bvd Paul Painleve – 59000 Lille, France. ' Industrial and Human Automatic Control and Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Research Group ONERA-Lille, Solid and Damage Mechanics Department, Structural Resistance and Design Section, 5, Bvd Paul Painleve – 59000 Lille, France. ' Industrial and Human Automatic Control and Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Research Group (URA CNRS D1775), University of Valenciennes – Le Mont Houy, B.P. 311, 59304 Valenciennes Cedex, France. ' Industrial and Human Automatic Control and Mechanical Engineering Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering Research Group ONERA-Lille, Solid and Damage Mechanics Department, Structural Resistance and Design Section, 5, Bvd Paul Painleve – 59000 Lille, France

Abstract: This paper deals with the characterisation of the residual stresses and strains due to the riveting process. In the first part, experimental results are given for two metal plate geometries and for three aspect ratios a/ø (edge margin/rivet shank diameter). As a result of this experimental investigation, a detailed analysis of forming and placing mechanisms is described for one rivet. Results show that the riveting process can be divided into seven distinct steps. The second part deals with the simulation capability by explicit FE codes, such as Pam-Solid™, to represent the local plastic flow along the riveting process. FEM results prove the numerical tool|s ability to represent this complex forming process. FEM numerical tools can therefore optimize rivet designs more quickly and cheaply than experiments.

Keywords: experimentation; finite element method; FEM; simulation; forming mechanisms; riveted joints; modelling; riveting process forming; residual stress; strain; local plastic flow; rivet design.

DOI: 10.1504/IJMPT.1998.036232

International Journal of Materials and Product Technology, 1998 Vol.13 No.3/4/5/6, pp.123 - 145

Available online: 01 Nov 2010

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