Title: Effects of low aromatics and low sulphur diesel fuels on particulate emissions

Authors: Nikolas Kyriakis, Theodoros Manikas, Panayiotis Pistikopoulos, Elias Vouitsis, Leonidas Ntziachristos, Zissis Samaras

Addresses: Laboratory of Applied Thermodynamics, Aristotle University, P.O.Box 458, GR 54006 Thessaloniki, Greece. Laboratory of Applied Thermodynamics, Aristotle University, P.O.Box 458, GR 54006 Thessaloniki, Greece. Laboratory of Applied Thermodynamics, Aristotle University, P.O.Box 458, GR 54006 Thessaloniki, Greece. Laboratory of Applied Thermodynamics, Aristotle University, P.O.Box 458, GR 54006 Thessaloniki, Greece. Laboratory of Applied Thermodynamics, Aristotle University, P.O.Box 458, GR 54006 Thessaloniki, Greece. Laboratory of Applied Thermodynamics, Aristotle University, P.O.Box 458, GR 54006 Thessaloniki, Greece

Abstract: The particulate emissions of a diesel passenger car running on 13 fuels (including a reference one), featuring major differences in aromatic content and minor differences in specific energy were measured, following the legislated European certification procedure. The tests included PM mass measurements, volatile and non-volatile PM split and particle number and size distribution over the NEDC, using an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI). The paper presents the results of the measurements and discusses the effects of fuel properties on the physical and chemical character of the particulates. It was found that the PM and CO emissions are in good correlation with the aromatic and sulphur content of the fuel, the size distribution of particulates being also affected.

Keywords: Particles; size distribution; aromatics; oxygenated fuels.

DOI: 10.1504/IJVD.2001.001949

International Journal of Vehicle Design, 2001 Vol.27 No.1/2/3/4, pp.31-43

Available online: 15 Aug 2003 *

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