Title: CFD experience on industrial combustors

Authors: F.C. Lockwood, T. Abbas, N.H. Kandamby, V. Sakthitharan

Addresses: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London SW7 2BX, UK. CINAR Ltd, 11 Elvaston Place, London SW7 5QG, UK. CINAR Ltd, 11 Elvaston Place, London SW7 5QG, UK. CINAR Ltd, 11 Elvaston Place, London SW7 5QG, UK

Abstract: This paper summarises the authors perspective of the current status of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with regard to engineering applications, especially those rThis paper summarises the authors| perspective of the current status of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) with regard to engineering applications, especially those relating to combustion processes. Particular emphasis is placed on the physical modelling of the turbulence, combustion and thermal radiation. The summary is supported by several example applications, again drawn from the authors| own experience. It is concluded that CFD is now an established design tool when expertly used. However, its accuracy and applicability remain tethered by several difficult problem areas in need of continuing research and development. These comprise: the need for an improved simulation of the turbulence for affordable computational cost; an economic simulation of the turbulence/chemistry interaction; usable reduced chemistry modelling of the combustion, of the ||engineering hydrocarbon fuel||, including the role of soot; simulations of the very many pollutants that are increasingly a matter of public concern; better simulation of the char burnout of solid fuel combustion; and enhanced routines which enable the unskilled user to generate effective grids for complex geometries for acceptable effort. The total research effort implied by these tasks is very considerable. The incentive is, however, powerful: every advance will lead, through the increased applicability and usefulness of CFD, to improved equipment for minimised development cost.elating to combustion processes. Particular emphasis is placed on the physical modelling of the turbulence, combustion and thermal radiation. The summary is supported by several example applications, again drawn from the authors own experience. It is concluded that CFD is now an established design tool when expertly used. However, its accuracy and applicability remain tethered by several dif¢Fcult problem areas in need of continuing research and development. These comprise the need for an improved simulation of the turbulence for affordable computational cost; an economic simulation of the turbulence/chemistry interaction; usable reduced chemistry modelling of the combustion, of the `engineering hydrocarbon fuel, including the role of soot; simulations of the very many pollutants that are increasingly a matter of public concern; better simulation of the char burnout of solid fuel combustion; and enhanced routines which enable the unskilled user to generate effective grids for complex geometries for acceptable effort. The total research effort implied by these tasks is very considerable. The incentive is, however, powerful every advance will lead, through the increased applicability and usefulness of CFD, to improved equipment for minimized development cost.

Keywords: CFD; combustion; emission; industrial combustors; NOx.

DOI: 10.1504/PCFD.2001.001466

Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics, An International Journal, 2001 Vol.1 No.1/2/3, pp.1-13

Published online: 03 Jul 2003 *

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