Title: Heavy vehicle ride comfort: literature survey

Authors: Zhenyu Jiang, Donald A. Streit, Moustafa El-Gindy

Addresses: The Pennsylvania Transportation Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. The Pennsylvania Transportation Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA. The Pennsylvania Transportation Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA

Abstract: The issue of ride comfort for vehicle operations has generated considerable interest recently especially in heavy vehicle systems since long distance drivers are more likely to experience high levels of vibration. This paper introduces the general concept of vibration-related health problems, discusses ride comfort assessment criteria and methods, then focuses on the methodology of using computer simulation to analyse ride comfort. The computer-based ride comfort model can be divided into three sub models: vehicle model, driver/seat model, and road profile input model. Time domain and frequency domain analysis is addressed for seven vehicle models, and detailed modelling techniques are introduced. Five driver/seat models are reviewed to examine the transmissibility and impedance of vibration data from the cab floor through the seat to the body of the operator; these characteristics are routinely neglected in vehicle simulation due to their complexity and uncertainty. Road profile data can be field-measured data as well as the data generated based on the power spectral density method. While the former gives the more accurate result, the latter will allow more flexibility to apply various road conditions to the simulation program.

Keywords: computer simulation; heavy vehicle; ride comfort; suspension; vehicle model.

DOI: 10.1504/IJHVS.2001.001163

International Journal of Heavy Vehicle Systems, 2001 Vol.8 No.3/4, pp.258-284

Published online: 01 Jul 2003 *

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