Title: Ethical leadership is not black and white: a case study on stakeholders and African rhino conservation

Authors: Deirdre Dixon; Raymond Papp; Chanelle Cox; L. Melissa Walters; Julia R. Pennington

Addresses: University of Tampa, 401 W. Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, FL 33606, USA ' University of Tampa, 401 W. Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, FL 33606, USA ' University of Tampa, 401 W. Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, FL 33606, USA ' University of Tampa, 401 W. Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, FL 33606, USA ' University of Tampa, 401 W. Kennedy Blvd., Tampa, FL 33606, USA

Abstract: Rhinos are a charismatic symbol of Africa's thriving wildlife, but their future is threatened. Rising demand for rhino horn along with inefficiency and corruption in protecting rhinos makes these animals vulnerable. The rhino population is facing a crisis situation with thousands killed illegally for their horns each year. The countries of eSwatini, Botswana, and South Africa are at the forefront of the issue, but little attention has been paid to understanding the positions and viewpoints of the local people. Qualitative interviews were conducted with local ranchers, conservationists, and the general population. Grounded theory techniques were utilised and various stakeholder interviews were conducted to examine the situation from different ethical perspectives. Primary ethical perspectives considered in this case include deontology, consequentialism, and justice/fairness; each perspective is applied to frame the issue with respect to different stakeholder groups that directly influence the rhino crisis.

Keywords: stakeholder; deontology; consequentialism; justice/fairness; qualitative; case study; Africa; rhinoceros.

DOI: 10.1504/IJTCS.2021.116145

International Journal of Teaching and Case Studies, 2021 Vol.12 No.2, pp.176 - 188

Received: 02 Dec 2020
Accepted: 22 Feb 2021

Published online: 01 Jul 2021 *

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