Title: Where to open maritime containers?: A decision model at the interface of maritime and urban logistics

Authors: Yann Bouchery; Johan Woxenius; Rickard Bergqvist

Addresses: The Centre of Excellence in Supply Chain, KEDGE Business School, 680 cours de la Libération, 33400 Talence, France ' Department of Business Administration, University of Gothenburg, Box 610, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden ' Department of Business Administration, University of Gothenburg, Box 610, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden

Abstract: After an era of developing large-scale hinterland access for maritime containers by use of rail and inland waterways, research interest and practice has witnessed a slight shift towards port-centric logistics. The big question is where to open import containers and close and seal the ones for export goods. Is it better done in the port vicinity or should the maritime containers also be used for transport to and from the hinterland? In other words, where is the stuffing and stripping operations best located? Focusing on the import of goods loaded in maritime containers, this article provides a model for assessing the options of locating Distribution Centres (DCs) in the vicinity of the port or in the hinterland, or using a combination of the two. The model is illustrated by a case study of import through the Port of Gothenburg, Sweden, comparing a port-centric DC with a location in Falköping, 130 kms inland. Unless more than 85% of the shipments out of DCs are bound for Gothenburg and its vicinity, the assessment favours stripping the maritime containers in the DC in Falköping.

Keywords: distribution centre; container; hinterland; port; port-centric logistics.

DOI: 10.1504/WRITR.2021.113482

World Review of Intermodal Transportation Research, 2021 Vol.10 No.1, pp.6 - 29

Received: 31 Jan 2019
Accepted: 03 Jan 2020

Published online: 27 Feb 2021 *

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