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Title: Evaluation of arbuscular mycorrhiza inoculation potential for sustainable production of aerobic rice var. MR1A

Authors: Rosina Baadu; Abdullah Shamsiah; Hendry Joseph

Addresses: Agricultural Biotechnology Research Group, Faculty of Plantation and Agrotechnology, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia ' Agricultural Biotechnology Research Group, Faculty of Plantation and Agrotechnology, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor, Malaysia ' Faculty of Plantation and Agrotechnology, Universiti Teknologi MARA Sabah Branch, Kota Kinabalu Campus, Locked Bag No. 71, 88997 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia

Abstract: A pot culture experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of different mycorrhiza inoculants and phosphate fertiliser application on the growth and nutrient uptake of aerobic rice var. MR1A. The contribution of mycorrhizae has been well acknowledged in sustainable agriculture. Mycorrhizae can influence the key ecosystem process of soil aggregation, act as an acquisition of soil nutrient absorption to improve the plant growth via their hyphae and alter the morphology of a root system by forming more branches and adventitious roots that functionally extend the root system of the plant. The results indicated that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) had increased the efficiency of phosphate fertiliser uptake by the plant. This is due to the ability of MR1A seedlings to form a symbiotic relationship with AMF inoculums. Thus, the information gathered from this study herein will help us to understand the role of AMF towards sustainable agriculture.

Keywords: arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi; Glomus mosseae; aerobic rice; Oryza sativa L. var. MR1A; phosphorus.

DOI: 10.1504/IJARGE.2020.107063

International Journal of Agricultural Resources, Governance and Ecology, 2020 Vol.16 No.1, pp.63 - 73

Received: 09 Apr 2019
Accepted: 01 Sep 2019

Published online: 29 Apr 2020 *

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