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Title: Effect of some operational conditions on bioelectricity production in algal fuel cell

Authors: Victoria Olaide Adenigba; Julius Kola Oloke; Iyabo Olunike Omomowo; Collins Ejovwokoghene Odjadjare; Oluwabusayo Odunola Oluyide; Seun Barnabas Ogunsona

Addresses: Department of Science Laboratory Technology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, P.M.B 4000 Oyo State, Nigeria ' Department of Pure and Applied Biology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, P.M.B 4000, Oyo State, Nigeria ' Department of Pure and Applied Biology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, P.M.B 4000, Oyo State, Nigeria ' Discipline of Microbiology, College of Agriculture Engineering and Science, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Westville Campus, Durban, PMB 4001, South Africa ' Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Health Sciences and Technology, P.M.B 316 Ijero Ekiti, Nigeria ' Department of Science Laboratory Technology, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, P.M.B 4000 Oyo State, Nigeria

Abstract: Optimisation of bioelectricity production from microalgae in double chamber algal fuel cell was investigated. Ten microalgae were isolated from pond and sea water and characterised molecularly. They were identified as follow: Nanochloropsis sp MG257918, Chlorella sorokiniana MG257919 and Coelastrella sp. MG257917. Others include Chlorococcum sp MG257921, Neosdesmus pupukensis MG257914, Chlorella vulgaris MG257915, Leptolyngbya boryana MG257913, Chlamydopodium starrii MG257920, Parachlorella sp. MF114127 and Neochloris aquatica MG257916. The potential of these microalgae to produce electricty was determined by using human urine as substrate. Three microalgae: C. vulgaris, C. sorokiniana and Parachlorella. sp with the best output were selected for optimisation under different conditions which are: pH, inoculum size, salt bridge concentration, oxidising agent and number of salt bridge. At the end of the different experiments, C. vulgaris, C. sorokiniana and Parachlorella sp. had maximum output of (1.49 V; 1.31 mA), (1.67 V; 1.4 mA) and (1.46 V; 1.25 mA) respectively. The optimum requirement for the 3 microalgae were similar: pH of 8-8.5, 10-15 ml of each algal as inoculum, 1 M KCl-based salt bridge, potassium permanganate as oxidising agent and increase in the number of salt bridges favoured optimum performance by each microalgae.

Keywords: algal fuel cell; human urine; microalgae; optimisation; pond water; sea water; cultural conditions.

DOI: 10.1504/IJRET.2020.106520

International Journal of Renewable Energy Technology, 2020 Vol.11 No.1, pp.70 - 85

Received: 28 Aug 2018
Accepted: 02 May 2019

Published online: 01 Apr 2020 *

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