Forthcoming articles

 


International Journal of Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments

 

These articles have been peer-reviewed and accepted for publication in IJSMILE, but are pending final changes, are not yet published and may not appear here in their final order of publication until they are assigned to issues. Therefore, the content conforms to our standards but the presentation (e.g. typesetting and proof-reading) is not necessarily up to the Inderscience standard. Additionally, titles, authors, abstracts and keywords may change before publication. Articles will not be published until the final proofs are validated by their authors.

 

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International Journal of Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments (4 papers in press)

 

Regular Issues

 

  • Using Community Mediated Learning Tools for Informal Learning Online   Order a copy of this article
    by Jenny Eppard 
    Abstract: Individuals are using the Internet in increasing numbers to engage in informal learning either alone or in a group. This study aims to determine which types of learning tools participants used in a specific online community to negotiate possible learning. The scope of this study was not to determine if learning occurred but to provide insight into the tools used in an online community that encompassed characteristics of learning.The methodology was a qualitative case study including detached observations,participant observations, interviews and document analysis. The study found that there were two types of learning tools used on the blog cognitive (discourse, action, reflectionand checking for accuracy) and physical (text, videos, images and links).
    Keywords: social media; informal learning; Activity Theory; artifacts; learning tools.

  • Students Perspectives on RateMyProfessors.com: An Empirical Investigation of Perception and Attitude   Order a copy of this article
    by Kuan-Pin Chiang 
    Abstract: Since its inception in 1999, the website of RateMyProfessors.com has been popular and has gathered more than 15 million ratings of approximate 1.5 million professors from more than 7000 schools. It provides college students opportunities to rate and comment on their instructors and helps them with course selection. The purpose of this study was to investigate college student perception and attitude toward this website. We analyzed survey data from 166 undergraduate students. Our findings suggest that overall students have positive experiences and find RMP as a reliable source of information for course selection. About 25% of participants who have posted ratings have stronger positive attitude toward the website and higher tendency to check the website before registering classes.
    Keywords: Student Evaluations; Faculty Evaluations; RateMyProfessor; Faculty Ratings; Attitude; Perception.

  • Motivations for Using Social Media: Comparative Study Based on Cultural Differences between American and Jordanian Students   Order a copy of this article
    by Heba Alquraan, Emad Abu-Shanab, Shadi Banitaan, Heyam Al-Tarawneh 
    Abstract: Social network sites (SNSs) have gained popularity over the last decade. Students use SNSs according to their personal differences, which are influenced by cultural and demographic factors. This paper proposed a model that included four basic factors that act as predictors of continuous use of SNSs. The factors are personal, social, educational and entertainment. The first objective of this study is to investigate the influence of the predictors on the dependent variable. Results indicated a full support of our proposed model, with an R2 = 0.296. The second objective is to explore the differences between US and Jordanian students. An ANOVA test was conducted and results yielded significant cultural differences and stronger than gender differences. The test yielded 17 significant differences compared to 10 based on gender. This research calls for more research that tries to explore what cultural factors cause such differences.
    Keywords: social networks; continuous use of SNs; Jordan; USA; cultural differences; comparative study.

  • Social Media Adoption in Higher Education: A case study involving IT/IS Students   Order a copy of this article
    by Kerstin Siakas, Pekka Makkonen, Errikos Siakas, Elli Georgiadou, Harjinder Rahanu 
    Abstract: This paper discusses the adoption and use of social media in Higher Education (HE). The aim of the research reported in this paper was to identify the main factors and problem areas in the adoption and use of social media in HE. Our study included a survey involving students of Information Technology (IT) and Information Systems (IS) in Greece and in Finland. In order to verify the findings from the survey a follow-up survey was also undertaken. The Unified Technology Adoption approach was identified to be a suitable underlying theory for this study. The analysis of viewpoints of students was needed in order to understand converging and diverging viewpoints. The results showed that infrastructure is the most important issue in the planning of learning/teaching activities based on social media, followed by the role of social influence. Based on the analysis guidelines for planning social-media-based learning activities are proposed. Indications of further work complete the paper.
    Keywords: social media adoption; social media in Higher Education; social network sites.