Forthcoming articles

 


International Journal of Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments

 

These articles have been peer-reviewed and accepted for publication in IJSMILE, but are pending final changes, are not yet published and may not appear here in their final order of publication until they are assigned to issues. Therefore, the content conforms to our standards but the presentation (e.g. typesetting and proof-reading) is not necessarily up to the Inderscience standard. Additionally, titles, authors, abstracts and keywords may change before publication. Articles will not be published until the final proofs are validated by their authors.

 

Forthcoming articles must be purchased for the purposes of research, teaching and private study only. These articles can be cited using the expression "in press". For example: Smith, J. (in press). Article Title. Journal Title.

 

Articles marked with this shopping trolley icon are available for purchase - click on the icon to send an email request to purchase.

 

Articles marked with this Open Access icon are freely available and openly accessible to all without any restriction except the ones stated in their respective CC licenses.

 

Register for our alerting service, which notifies you by email when new issues of IJSMILE are published online.

 

We also offer RSS feeds which provide timely updates of tables of contents, newly published articles and calls for papers.

 

International Journal of Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments (2 papers in press)

 

Regular Issues

 

  • Applying a modified technology acceptance model to qualitatively analyze the factors affecting microblogging integration   Order a copy of this article
    by Tian Luo 
    Abstract: The purpose of this research is to examine factors affecting students perception and engagement of microblogging integration using a qualitative approach. We employed a qualitative case study design to explore potential factors affecting microblogging integration in a hybrid course. Using the technology acceptance model (TAM) model as an umbrella framework, we examined through in-depth interviews with 18 participants the impact of microblogging integration into instruction that affected students' reported use and perceptions of their microblogging-supported learning experiences. We found that individual differences, system characteristics, social influence, and facilitating conditions all have impact on student participation and engagement in microblogging integration to varying degrees. We identified more granular factors within each of the four dimensions. Additionally, we proposed a Twitter user taxonomy based on perceived usefulness and usage behavior and discussed its broad implications in higher education learning environments. Finally, we identified several pedagogical implications pertaining to strategies of microblogging integration under the context of a hybrid course, and offered pertinent recommendations for future research.
    Keywords: computer-mediated communication; social media; technology acceptance model (TAM); microblogging; Twitter.

  • Analyzing Professional Discourse on Twitter: A Mixed Methods Analysis of the #openeducation Hashtag   Order a copy of this article
    by Fredrick Baker, Patrick Lowenthal 
    Abstract: Professionals and academics now use social networking sites like Twitter for scholarly discourse around resources and networking. Adding hashtags to tweets allows users to connect with previously unknown others around areas of common interest and provides opportunities to examine these connections. This study explored how open education is discussed on Twitter around the #openeducation hashtag through a scalable mixed methods content analysis model useful for the multi-pronged analyze of hashtag discourse. Researchers analyzed a convenience sample of 903 tweets using the #openeducation hashtag and grouped the results into themes. Thirty-two themes emerged, which were grouped into eight categories. To extend the research model, a questionnaire developed from the themes was piloted with a subset of active hashtag users. The results provide insight into the major discourse on open education, as well as a scalable means to analyze discourse on Twitter, identify active participants, and probe further about ties people have to a topic of interest.
    Keywords: Content Analysis; Twitter; Social Media; Open Education.