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International Journal of Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments

 

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International Journal of Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments (13 papers in press)

 

Regular Issues

 

  • A Literature Review on Mobile Learning   Order a copy of this article
    by Harun Bin Sinen 
    Abstract: Mobile learning has been increasingly used in the educational context. This article reviews the literature on mobile learning published in the recent five years and summarizes its definition, benefits and limitations, and additional concerns with the adoption of mobile learning. The definition of mobile learning is closely related to the mobility of technology, mobility of learners, and mobility of learning. The benefits of mobile learning include extending learning beyond the classroom; supporting situated, collaborative, and personalized learning; and also improving interactions. Limitations of mobile learning include small size of mobile devices, difficulty in inputting text, and high variability and low accessibility. Additional concerns involve social, cultural and organizational factors, advancement and cost of technology, readiness of faculty and students, and professional development of faculty.
    Keywords: Mobile learning, mobile technology, mobility, collaborative learning, interaction
     
  • DEVELOPING A LEARNING MATHEMATICS ENVIRONMENT ON TELEVISION   Order a copy of this article
    by Ratu Ilma 
    Abstract: The purposes of this paper are (1) to share the process of designing a Learning Environment (LE) of two dimensional geometric shapes on Television (TV) for learning and teaching using Realistic Mathematics Education (RME), and (2) to describe how a learning mathematics environment on television was used by the teacher in a classroom. Design Research approach was used in this study. The participants of this research were 20 primary school students. The data were collected from video recordings of classroom events. In this research, a sequence of instructional activities was designed and developed. Result shows that using education programs on TV can improve education in Indonesia and the dissemination of the Indonesian version of Realistic Mathematics Education (PMRI) in Indonesia.
    Keywords: Television (TV), PMRI, Two dimensional geometric shapes, Learning environment (LE), Design Research
     
  • Asynchronous Online Discussion Activities to Support University Students Self-directed Learning: Opportunities and Challenges Identified   Order a copy of this article
    by Wing Sum Cheung, Khe Foon Hew 
    Abstract: Singapore has identified self-directed learning (SDL) as one of the key learning outcomes for her Information Technology in Education Master plan 3. However, teachers may not know how to design activities that could cater for student SDL, and students themselves may face difficulties in using this approach in their learning. We believe that the use of a particular social media tool, the asynchronous online discussion forum, could support students' SDL. The purpose of this paper is to share how we planned and implemented the use of an asynchronous online discussion forum along with the specific pedagogical activities. We will explain why this particular approach was able to foster students' self-direction in learning based on the empirical findings collected from 20 participants at the National Institute of Education (Singapore). We also discuss the opportunities and challenges of using this particular approach and suggest several relevant areas for future research.
    Keywords: Self-directed learning, Asynchronous online discussion forum, pedagogical activities.
     
  • A Case Study of Learner and Instructor Perceptions of Flipped Course Design and Interactive Learning Environment   Order a copy of this article
    by Kimberly Hurley 
    Abstract: Student learning preferences have changed dramatically over the past decade aligned with the fast-paced changes in technology, however, university courses, instructors and classroom spaces have lagged behind technology advances. Emerging, innovative alternatives to traditional learning in higher education classes are on-line or distance education, flipped course design or learning model, and hybrid or blended courses. The focus of this study was to determine students and teacher perceptions of flipped course design and learning in a technologically advanced, interactive learning space. Quantitative and qualitative data revealed positive, reflective responses to student and teacher experiences with the flipped learning model (flipped content, pace of information delivery, in-class homework) and interactive classroom environment (learning environment, innovative technology, transparent problem-solving). The interactive technology in the class environment allowed students to experience multiple methods and opportunities for mastering content and skills. This environment also encouraged risk-taking in both teaching and learning.
    Keywords: flipped learning, flipped course design, student perceptions, interactive learning space, innovative pedagogy
     
  • SOCIAL MEDIA USE AND ITS IMPLICATIONS ON CHILD BEHAVIOUR: A STUDY OF A BASIC SCHOOL IN GHANA   Order a copy of this article
    by Naomi Amofah-Serwaa, Perpetua Dadzie 
    Abstract: The study explores the implication of social media use on child behaviour in a basic school in Ghana. A survey was conducted among pupils, teachers and parents of the school. Fifty-six (56) pupils were served with questionnaires while ten (10) teachers and twenty-two (22) parents were interviewed. The findings reveal that Facebook is the most preferred social media site. About half the pupils indicated that the models they observe on social media sites have not affected their behaviour. Some positive implications reported by parents and teachers include improvement in reading habits, dressing and communication. Negative implications also reported involve distraction of pupils attention from their studies, frequent use of Pidgin English as well as unnecessary fashion consciousness. The study recommends that parents should visit their childrens online friends to see what they post and receive from friends. Furthermore, teachers must explain the advantages and danger of using social media to children and advise them of beneficial sites to visit.
    Keywords: social media, child behaviour, pupils, Ghana
     
  • Facebook research from educational technology perspective: Analysis of doctoral dissertations in the US universities   Order a copy of this article
    by Myint Swe Khine 
    Abstract: Facebook has been growing exponentially as a dominant social networking site among users including students, teachers and administrators in the schools to faculty and administrative staff members in the universities. In recent years the use of Facebook as an educational technology tool ignites frequent discussion among educators and researcher alike in the academia. This study analyses doctoral dissertations on Facebook research submitted to the universities in the United States. It identifies major categories and topics, describes the trends and discusses gaps in the research area from the educational technology perspectives. The study selects 15 doctoral dissertations and analyses the research aims, methodologies and the findings. The study proposes four overlapping categories namely, Facebook as a tool, Facebook effects, Facebook usage and Privacy and disclosure. The analysis reveals that Facebook research in educational technology is still largely exploratory, using diverse theories. (140 words)
    Keywords: Facebook; Review; Educational Technology; Social networks; University; Learning; Students
     
  • Exploring Web-based Design and Technology Lessons in Lower Secondary Classrooms: A Case Study   Order a copy of this article
    by Kian Leng Tay, Choon Lang Quek 
    Abstract: This study investigated the use of Google sites as the web-based technology to support secondary school students learning of Design and Technology (D&T). Using qualitative survey, students reported their prior knowledge of e-learning and how the e- learning supported their learning. It was found that students did have certain misconceptions about what e-learning was about based on their prior e-learning experience. Despite these misconceptions, students were still able to recognize the benefits which e-learning brings. Students reported positive and negative experiences in using Wikis supported by Google sites to engage their learning and the implications for educators and researchers will also be discussed in this paper.
    Keywords: Design and technology, e-learning , secondary school, Wikis
     
  • Use of iPad for teaching and learning: a review of the literature   Order a copy of this article
    by Chrystella Lee 
    Abstract: The use of iPad in schools is increasingly prevalent. However, being a new technology, there is a need to ascertain how best the iPad could be leveraged on to enhance teaching and learning. This paper aims to find out students and teachers experiences in using the iPad for teaching and learning. For this purpose, 18 empirical, peer-reviewed articles were read to investigate the perceptions of students and teachers on the use of the iPad. While the iPad is found to enhance learning and teaching processes, provide seamless learning spaces and increase time for learning due to better productivity, tensions arise due to the distraction posed by the device, disparity in students and teachers views on its use and the need for teachers to change their roles when teaching and learning with the iPad. Considerations for better integration of the iPad in teaching and learning include providing adequate technical support and time for initial iPad familiarisation and focusing the professional development for teachers to build their skills, knowledge and attitudes towards the use of the iPad.
    Keywords: iPad; technology; iPad in education, iPad for teaching; iPad for learning; tensions; schools; student perceptions; teacher perceptions; device limitations, integration considerations
     

Special Issue on: "Flipped Classrooms with Technology,"

  • College students perception of the flipped classroom: A phenomenographical study   Order a copy of this article
    by Christopher Seitz, Muhsin Orsini 
    Abstract: The flipped classroom has become popular among educators; however, research on the topic has been relatively sparse, especially in terms of qualitative research. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore student perceptions of the flipped classroom. Undergraduate students who enrolled in a flipped public health course were invited to participate in the study. Thirteen students participated in semi-structured interviews to discuss their thoughts and experiences regarding the flipped classroom. Students viewed the flipped classroom according to out-of-class and in-class activities. Students felt that out-of-class activities were convenient, accommodated different learning styles, and were important for being prepared for class time. In terms of in-class activities, students enjoyed interactive activities (e.g., hands-on activities, class discussions), but some viewed the activities as anxiety provoking. Students also viewed in-class activities as useful for building student-instructor rapport. Implications for practice and future research are discussed.
    Keywords: Flipped; inverted; classroom; college; university; higher education; interactive; rapport; WNQ
     
  • Flipping a high school classroom as a response-to-learner intervention   Order a copy of this article
    by Lenie George, TJ Kopcha 
    Abstract: This study examines a flipped, high school classroom that used instructional videos as a performance intervention over the course of one academic year. Seventy-five high school students in an urban setting used a flipped model of instruction to support their mastery of mathematics benchmarks. Survey data and benchmark assessment results were collected to determine whether students preferred having access to online course material, how students interact with online course material outside of the classroom, and if the online course material adequately prepared students to pass benchmark assessments. This study suggests that transferring course material online to flip instruction can promote student responsibility, control, satisfaction, and success.
    Keywords: blended learning; differentiated instruction; flipped; flipped classrooms; inverted; inverted classrooms; mathematics; student responsibility; remediation; technology integration; urban
     
  • What the Flip: Impact of Flipped Instruction on Self-Regulated Learning   Order a copy of this article
    by Kimberly Hewitt, Wayne Journell, Revital Zilonka 
    Abstract: Flipped instruction, while becoming a more common pedagogical approach, is still a nascent area for empirical research. This comparative case study of the use of flipped instruction in two coursesone face-to-face and the other onlineby the same instructor examines how flipped instruction can be used differently in different courses. The study examines how students interact with flipped video content and how their use of it supports self-regulated learning. Findings suggest that flipped instruction both requires and cultivates self-regulated learning. Flipped instruction provides temporal space for metacognition and increases student self-efficacy and motivation. While flipped instruction has limitations, it makes online learning more palatable. The paper concludes withrecommendations for future research.
    Keywords: self-regulated learning; SRL; flipped instruction; reverse instruction; classroom flip; blended learning; inverted classroom
     
  • Teachers who use Flipping the Classroom: Professional development, feelings of autonomy and TPACK   Order a copy of this article
    by Nadira Saab, Shirley Stengs 
    Abstract: This paper reports on a study that investigates whether teachers who use the Flipping the Classroom approach carry out different professional learning activities, feel more autonomous and have more knowledge about the integration of pedagogy, technology and content than teachers who do not do so. The study was conducted through two questionnairescompleted by 71 and 41 secondary education teachers respectively. The results indicate that teachers who apply the Flipping the Classroom approach stated that theyperformed more individually oriented professional learning activities and were more developed in TPACK compared with teachers who do not use Flipping the Classroom. Keeping up to date by reading and through work-relatedtraining, trying out new methods by experimenting, and evaluating newly applied methods by reflecting were the activities they used to develop themselves the most. No differences were found for feelings of autonomy between the groups of teachers.
    Keywords: flipping the classroom; flipped learning; professional development; autonomy; tpack; teachers; secondary education.
     
  • Thats A Wrap: Overcoming Obstacles for Successful Video Design in Flipped Classes   Order a copy of this article
    by Kevin Yee, Christina Partin 
    Abstract: The flipped classroom offers benefits for students, faculty, and institutions. Yet, there are obstacles which sometimes prevent implementation of this pedagogical model. This article reviews existing literature and the authors experiences to suggest that there are four common challenges which impede on the process of flipping a classroom. These barriers include: the time commitment, a lack of institutional support, fear of technology, and budgetary constraints. Overcoming these barriers is essential to successfully flipping a classroom, particularly in the area of video design. The authors review existing literature and offer suggestions for improving best practices to overcome these barriers and create a positive experience for students, instructors, and institutions. Specifically, we aim to offer suggestions for best practices in video design for a successful flipped classroom experience.
    Keywords: flipped classroom; video design considerations; overcoming challenges, barriers, implementation issues; time commitment; lack of institutional support; fear of technology; budgetary constraints