Title: Canada's 2016 Fort McMurray wildfire evacuation: experiences of the Muslim community

Authors: Aaida A. Mamuji; Jack L. Rozdilsky

Addresses: Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, Disaster and Emergency Management, School of Administrative Studies, York University, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3, Canada ' Faculty of Liberal Arts and Professional Studies, Disaster and Emergency Management, School of Administrative Studies, York University, Toronto, Ontario, M3J 1P3, Canada

Abstract: This study explores issues faced by the largest visible minority group impacted by the 2016 Fort McMurray wildfire evacuation - the Muslim community. Through qualitative methods and deep analysis of data gathered, challenges and opportunities that are relevant both for improving emergency preparedness within the Muslim community, and for improving the provision of emergency social services at large, are discussed. The overall goal of this study is to give voice to the experiences of the Muslim community, and to highlight specific accommodations that could have been beneficial. While in recent years, research efforts have been undertaken to better improve the needs of First Nations and Indigenous groups in Canada during wildfire disasters, this work is a starting point for considering other portions of Canada's diverse communities.

Keywords: wildfire; wildfire evacuation; emergency response; disaster management; Fort McMurray; Canada; Muslim community; deep analysis; visible minority; vulnerability; lived experience.

DOI: 10.1504/IJEM.2019.10020871

International Journal of Emergency Management, 2019 Vol.15 No.2, pp.125 - 146

Received: 26 Dec 2017
Accepted: 16 Sep 2018

Published online: 25 Apr 2019 *

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