Title: Effect of corncob ash blended cement on the properties of lateritic interlocking blocks

Authors: Solomon O. Oyebisi; Festus A. Olutoge; Olatokunbo M. Ofuyatan; Abiodun A. Abioye

Addresses: Civil Engineering Department, Covenant University, Km 10, Idiroko Road, P.M.B. 1023, Canaan Land, Ota, 00176-0000, Nigeria ' Civil Engineering Department, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, 00176-0000, Nigeria ' Civil Engineering Department, Covenant University, Km 10, Idiroko Road, P.M.B. 1023, Canaan Land, Ota, 00176-0000, Nigeria ' Mechanical Engineering Department, Covenant University, Km 10, Idiroko Road, P.M.B. 1023, Canaan Land, Ota, 00176-0000, Nigeria

Abstract: The increase in carbon dioxide emissions due to cement manufacturing and improper disposal of corncob leads to environmental pollution and agricultural wastage respectively. This study investigates the use of corncob ash (CCA) as cement additive in producing lateritic interlocking blocks (LIB). Portland limestone cement (PLC) was replaced by CCA in varying percentages 5, 10, 15 and 20%. Effect of CCA on compressive strength and water absorption were determined and compared with the Nigerian standard requirements. The experimental findings showed that 3% PLC, 15% CCA with a compressive strength of 4.49 MPa and water absorption of 6% at 28 days curing met the recommendations of both the Nigerian Building and Road Research Institute and the Nigerian Industrial Standards. Recycling of CCA as a promising raw material supplement appears to be a viable solution not only to the environmental problem but also to the problem of adopting indigenous waste material in the production of LIB.

Keywords: Portland limestone cement; corncob ash; lateritic interlocking block; compressive strength; water absorption; density; predictive model; sustainability; indigenous materials; low-cost housing.

DOI: 10.1504/PIE.2017.092729

Progress in Industrial Ecology, An International Journal, 2017 Vol.11 No.4, pp.373 - 387

Available online: 20 Jun 2018 *

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