Title: The effects of felt accountability and role ambiguity on organisational commitment: a replication of results analysing social network analysis

Authors: Jacob W. Breland; Mary Dana Laird; Sonya Bhakta; Kenneth Zantow

Addresses: Department of Management and International Business, College of Business, University of Southern Mississippi, 730 East Beach Boulevard, Long Beach, MS 39560, USA ' The University of Tulsa, Helmerich Hall, Room 301-D, 800 South Tucker Drive, Tulsa, OK 74104, USA ' The University of Tulsa, Helmerich Hall, Room 301-D, 800 South Tucker Drive, Tulsa, OK 74104, USA ' Department of Management and International Business, College of Business, University of Southern Mississippi, 730 East Beach Boulevard, Long Beach, MS 39560, USA

Abstract: Using the conflict theory of decision making (Janis and Mann, 1977) as a theoretical foundation, we examined the moderating effects of role ambiguity on the felt accountability-organisational commitment relationship. Data from a the USA healthcare provider indicated that clear role expectations ameliorate the strain reactions caused by felt accountability on continuance commitment, but not on affective commitment. In particular, as felt accountability increased, employees who perceived low levels of role ambiguity experienced more continuance commitment, but those with high role ambiguity perceptions experienced less continuance commitment. By measuring felt accountability with a roster (i.e., social network analysis) and an established scale, we were able to replicate our results, thus lending credence to our findings and providing a new measurement approach for an important organisational stressor.

Keywords: felt accountability; role ambiguity; organisational commitment; social network analysis.

DOI: 10.1504/IJTIS.2016.083584

International Journal of Transitions and Innovation Systems, 2016 Vol.5 No.3/4, pp.231 - 253

Available online: 10 Apr 2017 *

Full-text access for editors Access for subscribers Purchase this article Comment on this article