You can view the full text of this article for free using the link below.

Title: Biologically-inspired swallowing robot for investigation of texture modified foods

Authors: Steven Dirven; Weiliang Xu; Leo K. Cheng; Jacqueline Allen; John Bronlund

Addresses: Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, 1142, New Zealand ' Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, 1142, New Zealand ' Auckland Bioengineering Institute, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, 1142, New Zealand ' Department of Surgery, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland Mail Centre, 1142, New Zealand ' School of Engineering and Advanced Technology, College of Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 11 222, Palmerston North, New Zealand

Abstract: Textural and rheological characteristics of foods are known to profoundly affect the swallowing process. Food technologists continue to exploit this notion in the management of symptomatic swallowing disorders (dysphagia) where novel foods are designed to elicit more reliable transport characteristics. Currently, little is understood about the relationship between food bolus formulation and its flow-induced interactions with the swallowing tract. Experimentation of a medical nature in this field is extremely challenging, and may put patients at risk. In the rheological domain the deformation fields are dissimilar to that of the biological system. In response to these limitations, quantitative assessment of bolus transport by a novel rheometric testing device is proposed. This paper describes the inspiration for a biologically-inspired robotic swallowing device to be applied to address these issues. This will allow for an improved understanding of swallowing mechanics and food design in the engineering, medical, and food technology fields.

Keywords: swallowing robots; peristalsis; biological inspiration; texture modified food; TMF; food bolus formulation; food technology; rehology; biologically-inspired computation; swallowing disorders; dysphagia; bolus transport; rheometric testing; swallowing mechanics; food design.

DOI: 10.1504/IJBBR.2013.058719

International Journal of Biomechatronics and Biomedical Robotics, 2013 Vol.2 No.2/3/4, pp.163 - 171

Available online: 17 Jan 2014 *

Full-text access for editors Access for subscribers Free access Comment on this article