Title: Framework for adaptive fluid-structure interaction with industrial applications

Authors: Johan Jansson; Niyazi Cem Degirmenci; Johan Hoffman

Addresses: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz), CSC KTH 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden; Basque Center for Applied Mathematics (BCAM), Alameda de Mazarredo 14, 48009 Bilbao, Bizkaia Basque-Country, Spain ' KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz), CSC KTH 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden ' KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Department of High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz), CSC KTH 100 44 Stockholm, Sweden

Abstract: We present developments in the Unicorn-HPC framework for unified continuum mechanics, enabling adaptive finite element computation of fluid-structure interaction, and an overview of the larger FEniCS-HPC framework for automated solution of partial diffential equations of which Unicorn-HPC is a part. We formulate the basic model and finite element discretisation method and adaptive algorithms. We test the framework on a 2D model problem consisting of a flexible beam in channel flow, and to illustrate the capabilities of the computational framework, we show two application examples from industry and medicine. We simulate a flexible mixer plate in turbulent flow in an exhaust system where the target output is aeroacoustic quantities. The second example is a self-oscillating vocal fold configuration, where the ultimate goal is to predict how the voice is affected by physiological changes from aerodynamics. Here we give the displacement signal of a point on the folds.

Keywords: high performance computing; fluid structure interaction; adaptive mesh refinement; unified continuum mechanics; finite element method; adaptive FEM; partial diffential equations; PDEs; finite element discretisation; modelling; flexible beam; channel flow; simulation; flexible mixer plate; turbulent flow; exhaust systems; aeroacoustics; self-oscillating vocal fold configuration; human voice; physiological changes; aerodynamics.

DOI: 10.1504/IJMATEI.2013.054394

International Journal of Materials Engineering Innovation, 2013 Vol.4 No.2, pp.166 - 186

Published online: 06 Jun 2013 *

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