Title: Non-invasive detecting human tissue hemoglobin concentrations using near-infrared spectroscopy with in vivo calibration

Authors: Yichao Teng; Yue Li; Xinlin Hou

Addresses: Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ' Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ' Department of Pediatrics, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing 100034, China

Abstract: Human tissue oxygenation status can be completely indicated by its hemoglobin concentrations. To detect them non-invasively using continuous-wave near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), the 'in vivo calibration' algorithm, which was comparing tissue absorption before and after the change of tissue oxygenation, was adopted to obtain its reduced scattering coefficient. The hemoglobin concentrations of forearm muscle of four adults during occlusion, and those of brain cortex of three newborns during oxygen inhalation were detected. For the four adults, the µs of the forearm muscle were 6.01~7.87 cm−1 under 758 nm, and its total hemoglobin concentration (CtHb) was 37.5 ± 3.1 µM at the beginning of occlusion. For the three newborns, the cerebral µs were 5.46~8.42 cm−1 under 758 nm, and CtHb was 50.1 ± 6.1 µM at the beginning of oxygen inhalation. All the results were consistent with most recent reports. In summary, the in vivo calibration algorithm is effective to detect human tissue hemoglobin concentrations.

Keywords: near-infrared spectroscopy; NIRS; tissue hemoglobin concentration; oxygen inhalation; absorption coefficient; reduced scattering coefficient; human tissue oxygenation; forearm muscles; adults; occlusion; brain cortex; newborns; in vivo calibration.

DOI: 10.1504/IJMA.2012.046586

International Journal of Mechatronics and Automation, 2012 Vol.2 No.1, pp.25 - 33

Available online: 01 May 2012 *

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