Title: Direct optimisation-based planar human vertical jumping simulation

Authors: Burak Ozsoy, Jingzhou Yang, Bradley Howard, Zachary J. Domire, Rhonda Boros

Addresses: Human-Centric Design Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, 79409, Texas, USA. ' Human-Centric Design Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, 79409, Texas, USA. ' Human-Centric Design Research Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, 79409, Texas, USA. ' Department of Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, 79409, Texas, USA. ' Department of Health, Exercise, and Sport Sciences, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, 79409, Texas, USA

Abstract: Vertical jumping is one of the fundamental motions among other jumping types in sport biomechanics. In literature, two major approaches have been investigated: experiment-based methods and optimisation-based methods. Experiment-based methods are time consuming and tedious. Optimisation-based methods for musculoskeletal models are computationally expensive because their models include all muscles and explicit integration of equation of motion. In this pilot study, a direct optimisation-based method for a skeletal model was proposed in sagittal plane, where this formulation was based on joint space that was only considered the resultant results of muscles (joint torques) instead of individual muscles to reduce computational time. This optimisation problem was solved by a commercial optimisation solver SNOPT which uses sequential quadratic programming (SQP) method with 35 design variables 2,838 non-linear constraints and 99,330 constraint gradients. Preliminary results highly correlated results from the literature. This simple planar simulation is the first step to understand the cause and effect for vertical jumping with or without arm swing.

Keywords: vertical jumping; planar models; injury; performance; arm swing; human jumping; modelling; sport biomechanics; optimisation; skeletal models; joint space; sequential quadratic programming; simulation.

DOI: 10.1504/IJHFMS.2011.041637

International Journal of Human Factors Modelling and Simulation, 2011 Vol.2 No.1/2, pp.47 - 66

Published online: 28 Jul 2011 *

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