Title: Designing and building healthy places for children

Authors: Arthur M. Wendel, Andrew L. Dannenberg, Howard Frumkin

Addresses: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health, 4770 Buford Highway, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Preventive Medicine Residency, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. ' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health, 4770 Buford Highway, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. ' Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Environmental Health, 4770 Buford Highway, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA

Abstract: The design and construction of the built environment have broad implications for the health of children. Healthy places should protect children from injury, pollutants and disease, provide children with a place to be physically active, play and experience nature, and promote a sustainable future. Health promotion can occur at all scales of the built environment, including buildings, communities and global infrastructure. The disabled, poor and other disadvantaged groups may benefit from built environment improvements. These improvements require partnerships among urban planners, engineers, architects, developers, public health practitioners and communities.

Keywords: built environment; children; public health; child health; health promotion; healthy places.

DOI: 10.1504/IJENVH.2008.020927

International Journal of Environment and Health, 2008 Vol.2 No.3/4, pp.338 - 355

Available online: 24 Oct 2008 *

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