Title: Study of the performance and emissions of a high-speed direct injection diesel engine operating on ethanol–diesel fuel blends

Authors: C.D. Rakopoulos, K.A. Antonopoulos, D.C. Rakopoulos, D.T. Hountalas, E.C. Andritsakis

Addresses: Internal Combustion Engines Laboratory, Thermal Engineering Department, School of Mechanical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou St., Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens, Greece. ' Internal Combustion Engines Laboratory, Thermal Engineering Department, School of Mechanical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou St., Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens, Greece. ' Internal Combustion Engines Laboratory, Thermal Engineering Department, School of Mechanical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou St., Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens, Greece. ' Internal Combustion Engines Laboratory, Thermal Engineering Department, School of Mechanical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou St., Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens, Greece. ' Internal Combustion Engines Laboratory, Thermal Engineering Department, School of Mechanical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Heroon Polytechniou St., Zografou Campus, 15780 Athens, Greece

Abstract: An experimental study is conducted to evaluate the effects of using various blends of ethanol with normal diesel fuel, in blend ratios of 5/95, 10/90 and 15/85, on the performance and exhaust emissions of a high-speed, direct injection (DI), Ricardo/Cussons |Hydra| diesel engine. The tests are conducted using each of the above fuel blends or neat diesel fuel. Volumetric fuel consumption, exhaust gas temperature, exhaust smokiness and exhaust regulated gas emissions such as nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and total unburned hydrocarbons are measured. The differences in the performance and exhaust emission parameters from the baseline operation of the engine, that is, when working with neat diesel fuel, are determined and compared. Theoretical aspects of diesel engine combustion are used to aid the interpretation of the engine behaviour.

Keywords: ethanol–diesel blends; high-speed diesel engines; performance; exhaust emissions; engine performance; direct injection diesel engines; ethanol; volumetric fuel consumption; exhaust gas temperature; exhaust smokiness; combustion; alternative propulsion.

DOI: 10.1504/IJAP.2007.013020

International Journal of Alternative Propulsion, 2007 Vol.1 No.2/3, pp.309 - 324

Available online: 03 Apr 2007 *

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