Title: Design and control of a low cost myoelectric prosthetic hand

Authors: Kyle L. Walker; Thomas Macdonald; Lauren Lavery; Jack Waddell; Matthew McDonald; Lykourgos Petropoulakis; John Soraghan

Addresses: Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Royal College Building, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK ' Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Royal College Building, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK ' Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Royal College Building, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK ' Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Royal College Building, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK ' Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Royal College Building, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK ' Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Royal College Building, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK ' Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Royal College Building, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK

Abstract: This paper presents a prototype prosthetic hand manufactured using 3D printing techniques. The device is capable of performing four different grip patterns with an average response time of less than 300 ms, controlled wirelessly by the electromyography (EMG) signals within the user's arm through a Myo armband sensor package. Evaluation of current devices concluded that there were very limited options for low cost but functional artificial hands; the prosthetic presented in this paper amounts to a manufacturing cost of £146 (not inclusive of the Myo armband) and retains the functionality required to be of benefit to the user. Compared to the devices researched, this cost is extremely low and presents a basis for further development. The major achievement of this device is that the electronics (minus the wireless sensor package) are entirely encapsulated within the device, not requiring an additional forearm piece to house components and reducing the weight significantly. Areas for future development of the prototype are highlighted, such as the addition of sensors and haptic feedback, increasing the robustness through the use of more reliable materials and improving the capability of the device through additional grip patterns.

Keywords: prosthetic; 3D printing; myoelectric; EMG; low cost; robotics; wireless control.

DOI: 10.1504/IJMA.2020.108800

International Journal of Mechatronics and Automation, 2020 Vol.7 No.2, pp.94 - 104

Received: 26 Sep 2019
Accepted: 20 Feb 2020

Published online: 24 Jul 2020 *

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