Title: Impact of personal cultural orientations and moral potency on self-employment intentions: the moderating role cognitive styles

Authors: Martin Mabunda Baluku; Kathleen Otto

Addresses: Faculty of Psychology, Work and Organizational Psychology, Philipps-Universität, Gutenbergstr, 18, D-35032 Marburg, Germany; Department of Educational, Social and Organizational Psychology, School of Psychology, Makerere University, P.O. Box 7072, Kampala, Uganda ' Faculty of Psychology, Work and Organizational Psychology, Philipps-Universität, Gutenbergstr, 18, D-35032 Marburg, Germany

Abstract: Self-employment presents a viable work opportunity for the unemployed. However, not all unemployed individuals are attracted to self-employment. Based on the assumptions of the situated metacognition model of entrepreneurial mind-set and theory of planned behaviour, we explain why unemployed individuals may evaluate self-employment as an attractive opportunity for career progression. Using a sample of 227 unemployed young people from East Africa, we examine the interactional effects of cognitive style, personal cultural orientation and moral potency. Our findings show that unemployed young individuals with an adaptive cognitive style have higher self-employment intentions compared to their counterparts with intuitive or analytic styles. Moderation analyses showed that the effects of risk aversion and moral potency on self-employment intentions are conditioned by cognitive styles. Practical implications of these findings are discussed.

Keywords: self-employment; cognitive adaptability; cognitive styles; cultural orientation; entrepreneurship; independence; moral potency; risk aversion; small business; entrepreneurial intentions.

DOI: 10.1504/IJESB.2019.10023244

International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, 2019 Vol.37 No.4, pp.545 - 572

Received: 17 Oct 2017
Accepted: 21 Oct 2017

Published online: 22 Aug 2019 *

Full-text access for editors Access for subscribers Purchase this article Comment on this article