No tendency for human operators to agree with automation whose response bias matches their own
by Megan L. Bartlett; Jason S. McCarley
International Journal of Human Factors and Ergonomics (IJHFE), Vol. 5, No. 2, 2018

Abstract: Evidence suggests that false alarm-prone decision aids can engender stronger disuse than miss-prone aids, even when automation false alarms and misses are matched in perceptual characteristics. The present experiment sought to replicate this effect, and examine whether it reflects a tendency for operators to agree with automation whose response bias matches their own. Participants performed a simulated baggage screening task, alone or with assistance from an automated decision aid prone either to misses or false alarms. A point system encouraged participants themselves to adopt either a conservative, liberal, or neutral response bias. Target-present responses were faster from participants assisted by the miss-prone aid than from participants assisted by the false alarm-prone aid, regardless of the human operators' response bias. Neither response times nor accuracy rates, however, showed evidence of a generalised asymmetry in the effects of automation false alarms and misses.

Online publication date: Tue, 05-Jun-2018

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