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Strategies for building material reuse and recycle
by William E. Roper
International Journal of Environmental Technology and Management (IJETM), Vol. 6, No. 3/4, 2006

 

Abstract: Reuse and recycling of building material is a growing area of interest and concern in many parts of the USA. Current practices and trends in the building material waste management area are examined from a building life cycle standpoint or cradle to reincarnation concept. Strategies include zero waste, integrated recycling, international approaches, reuse of materials, resource optimisation, waste reduction, and deconstruction. Examination of the waste management hierarchy and life cycle management of material is used to improve the understanding of reuse and recycle opportunities. Other considerations include cost, economic factors, social factors and environmental factors. All of these assessments are needed to develop a comprehensive waste management plan for a specific project. Four case studies are also presented to illustrate the benefits that can be derived from effective building material reuse and recycle.

Online publication date: Fri, 10-Feb-2006

 

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