Women in management: a developing country perspective
by Jashim Uddin Ahmed; Mohammad Jasim Uddin; N.M. Ashikuzzaman; Naureen Khan
International Journal of Gender Studies in Developing Societies (IJGSDS), Vol. 1, No. 4, 2016

Abstract: Women leadership has been a major issue in corporate management, especially in the developing country. Although some studies have addressed this issue from the developed country perspective, little research has been conducted to identify impediments for women leadership from the developing country perspective. Thus, the main purpose of this study is to identify the factors that impede women leadership in corporations. Specifically, the study seeks to answer two research questions. First, why there are still so few women in top management in Bangladesh? Why are women still confined to jobs that only allow them to excel at a slower pace? The study is based on in-depth interviews with top women managers. The findings suggest societally, organisational culture and political factors impede women leadership. Implications of women leadership in corporate management are also discussed.

Online publication date: Tue, 18-Oct-2016

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