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A concern about shifting interactions between indigenous and non-indigenous parties in US climate adaptation contexts
by Kyle Powys Whyte
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review (IER), Vol. 15, No. 2/3, 2014

 

Abstract: Indigenous peoples everywhere are preparing for or already coping with a number of climate change impacts, from rising sea-levels to shifting harvesting seasons. It is plausible that the capacity for environmental protection of two political institutions will change in relation to certain impacts: treaties and indigenous governmental jurisdictions recognised by the federal governments of nations such as the USA or Canada. This essay explores critically whether current solutions for these changes depend far too crucially on non-indigenous parties' coming to an appropriate understanding of indigenous culture and self-determination.

Online publication date: Fri, 18-Jul-2014

 

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