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The case for an open science in technology enhanced learning
by Peter Kraker; Derick Leony; Wolfgang Reinhardt; Günter Beham
International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning (IJTEL), Vol. 3, No. 6, 2011

 

Abstract: In this paper, we make the case for an open science in technology enhanced learning (TEL). Open science means opening up the research process by making all of its outcomes, and the way in which these outcomes were achieved, publicly available on the World Wide Web. In our vision, the adoption of open science instruments provides a set of solid and sustainable ways to connect the disjoint communities in TEL. Furthermore, we envision that researchers in TEL would be able to reproduce the results from any paper using the instruments of open science. Therefore, we introduce the concept of open methodology, which stands for sharing the methodological details of the evaluation provided, and the tools used for data collection and analysis. We discuss the potential benefits, but also the issues of an open science, and conclude with a set of recommendations for implementing open science in TEL.

Online publication date: Wed, 08-Feb-2012

 

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