An exploratory study of attitudes toward tourism on American Indian reservations
by Daniel M. Spencer, John Henry Glover
International Journal of Tourism Anthropology (IJTA), Vol. 1, No. 2, 2011

Abstract: Tourism development is widely considered a means by which the economies of American Indian reservations (AIRs) can be strengthened. Understanding attitudes toward tourism on AIRs is important to effectively plan for such development. This study contributed to the advancement of such an understanding, drawing upon data from intercept surveys of attendees at American Indian wacipis (pow-wows) in South Dakota, USA. It found that American Indian respondents were generally less sanguine about tourism on AIRs than non-American Indian respondents, that American Indian respondents generally supported tourism on AIRs but such support was by no means universal, that attitudes toward tourism on AIRs were only weakly related to demographic characteristics, that inter-tribal differences in such attitudes existed even among ethnically related Siouan tribes, and that American Indian respondents could be meaningfully disaggregated according to their attitude composites.

Online publication date: Thu, 26-May-2011

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