The Botulinum J.   »   2015 Vol.3, No.1

 

 

Title: Botulism mortality in the USA, 1975-2009

 

Authors: Kelly A. Jackson; Barbara E. Mahon; John Copeland; Ryan P. Fagan

 

Addresses:
Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, MS D63, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, MS D63, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA
Biostatistics and Information Management Office, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2500 Century Boulevard, MS E33, Atlanta, GA 30345, USA
Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, MS D63, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA

 

Abstract: Botulism had mortality rates >60% before the 1950s. We reviewed confirmed botulism cases in the USA during 1975-2009 including infant, foodborne, wound, and other/unknown acquisition categories, and calculated mortality ratios. We created a multivariate logistic regression model for non-infant cases (foodborne, wound, and other/unknown). Overall mortality was 3.0% with 109 botulism-related deaths among 3,618 botulism cases [18 (<1%) deaths among 2,352 infant botulism cases, 61 (7.1%) deaths among 854 foodborne botulism cases, 18 (5.0%) deaths among 359 wound botulism cases, and 12 (22.6%) deaths among 53 other/unknown botulism cases]. Mortality among all cases increased with age; it was lowest among infants (0.8%) and highest among persons ≥80 years old (34.4%). Toxin type F had higher mortality (13.8%) than types A, B, or E (range, 1.4% to 4.1%). Efforts to reduce botulism mortality should target non-infant transmission categories and older adults.

 

Keywords: botulism mortality; infants; age groups; USA; United States; food; wounds; botulism-related deaths; Clostridium botulinum.

 

DOI: 10.1504/TBJ.2015.078132

 

The Botulinum J., 2015 Vol.3, No.1, pp.6 - 17

 

Available online: 29 Jun 2016

 

 

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