Int. J. of Technology Management   »   1987 Vol.2, No.3/4

 

 

Title: Science, technology and work organization

 

Author: Jean J. Chanaron, Jacques Perrin

 

Addresses:
Research Fellow in Economics in the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) and researcher in the Research Institute for Economic Development and Planning, Grenoble University, France; currently visiting fellow at the University of Manchester (PREST), UK
Research Fellow in Economics in the French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS) and researcher in the Research Institute for Economic Development and Planning, Grenoble University, France; currently visiting fellow at the University of Sussex (SPRU), UK

 

Abstract: The relationship between technology and work organization is neither direct nor one-way. Science has a tendency to interfere in this relationship. So, are the dominant paradigms of the time – for example, mechanical science during the first Industrial Revolution, information science today – the key to understanding all technologies, including organization technology? To the mechanistic affiliation of the Taylor scientific management would correspond information affiliation of the new forms of work organization; the quality circle is an example of this. Nevertheless, the coexistence of these two work organization systems in firms raises questions: are they compatible or contradictory? The introduction of computer-aided design and manufacturing systems reproduces in new forms the separation between production and design.

 

Keywords: Taylorism; work organization; scientific management; quality circles; technical change; computer science; software; computer-aided design; CAD; computer-aided manufacturing; CAM; CADCAM.

 

DOI: 10.1504/IJTM.1987.026135

 

Int. J. of Technology Management, 1987 Vol.2, No.3/4, pp.377 - 389

 

Available online: 27 May 2009

 

 

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